Helicopters have come a long way since their creation in Germany during WWII. We have seen the emergence and evolution of helicopters for attack, transport, observation, utility, and beyond. Despite the multiple applications that helicopters can serve, they often use the same types of landing gear. The most common landing gear for helicopters includes wheels, skids, and floats. In this blog, we will discuss the three main types of landing gear and what their differences are.

Wheels serve as the original landing gear for helicopters and are still widely used to this day for many models and applications. Wheels provide great ground maneuverability that makes taxiing for liftoff easier. They also have reduced drag as compared to other styles of landing gear if the model features retractability. Their downsides, however, are that they can cause increased maintenance and add much weight to a helicopter, which can prove detrimental for lighter rotorcraft as hydraulics and brake systems can add a few hundred pounds to the vehicle.

Skids prove to be a much lighter alternative to wheels, making them very beneficial to lighter helicopters. As they are a fixed placement, they also require much less maintenance than wheels do. Their disadvantages lie in their inability to be easily taxiid for flight. With skids, they can be moved with ground handling wheels or a platform dolly, but these may require multiple people or a pilot who is confident in landing on a platform.

The third, though less common, form of landing gear is floats. These helicopters have the added benefit of being able to takeoff and land from the ground or water, opening them to many other applications. These helicopters can feature a waterproof or resistant hull, as well as be fitted with utility floats. Float landing gear allows for helicopter use in air-sea rescue, oceanography, marine salvage, as well as any standard helicopter operation.

With each type of landing gear, the use will be the deciding factor for which type of landing gear is the best fit. Considering the weight, type of landing desired, and abilities can help ensure that the right helicopter landing gear is chosen.

At ASAP Aviation Stock, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find helicopter skids and accessories you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapaviationstock.com or call us at +1-763-401-8616.



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Many people nowadays have flown in an aircraft at some point in their life. They may gaze from their seat as the wings glide through the sky, see the engines spin fast during takeoff, or maybe watch a movie on a provided screen on the seat in front of them during their flight. Others may be fascinated by the many tools and electronics they see in the captain’s cockpit as they enter and exit the plane. All of these are things that make up the planes that we are familiar with, but there are actually millions of small and large aircraft parts that all come together to make these grand machines. And with all of these parts, the need to eventually repair or replace comes with time.

Just like a passenger car, aircraft often need maintenance and inspections on various parts to ensure that everything is running smoothly and is safe for use. With time, even the cosmetics of a plane may wear out, warranting replacement by being purchased and installed onto the plane during maintenance.

Aircraft interior parts may include those that we are familiar with, such as seats, carpets, bins, pull out tables, and more. While these may not serve any mechanical functionality the way engines do, these parts often wear out very quickly cosmetically and need to be replaced from time to time. Many commercial airlines keep thousands of replacement components for these issues and all can be swapped out on an as needed basis.

Exterior parts, including engines, wings, windshields, and aircraft propellers, often need replacement as well as they are subjected to weather and the elements during their use. These components are often replaced to meet minimum safety standards as well and during inspections, parts that are found to be in disrepair will cause airplanes to stay grounded until the part is repaired or replaced.

Other components are also replaced due simply to being outdated. Parts that are replaced for this reason can include audio panels, autopilots, radar altimeters, storm scopes, weather radars, HF radios, and more to ensure that everything is up to date and functions smoothly. Even the actual frames of the aircraft need to be replaced as well when needed.

When parts are ready to be replaced, the aircraft owner or commercial airline finds a parts dealer to supply them with necessary components for replacement. While commercial airlines keep the typically replaced parts they need, they still have to obtain these items by purchasing from parts dealers. Parts dealers range from small to very large, and depending on who one utilizes, they may specialize in one or two aspects of airplane components. Nevertheless, conducting general maintenance and inspections of aircraft components keeps aircraft running smoothly and safely at all times, and obtaining these needed parts is very important to airlines and aircraft owners.

At ASAP Aviation Stock, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find aircraft components you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapaviationstock.com or call us at +1-763-401-8616.



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Jet engines are marvels of engineering. A symphony of tiny, intricate parts work in tandem to make an aircraft take flight. Although it's easy to be overwhelmed by the complexity of each moving part, the basic jet engine components are relatively simple. There are five main sections of an engine: the air inlet, the compressor, the combustor, the turbine, and the exhaust. This blog will provide some basic information on each of these.

The air inlet, or fan, is the frontmost part of the engine. The large titanium blades spin, intaking vast quantities of air. Part of the air flows into the engine core where it plays a vital role in combustion. The other part bypasses the core , helping to quiet the engine while contributing to the thrust.

The next component is the compressor. Sitting just behind the air inlet, the compressor is the first section of the engine’s core. It is tasked with taking the air from the inlet and compressing it, thereby substantially increasing the air’s heat and pressure. From there, the compressed air is led into the combustion chamber.

The combustor, or combustion chamber, is the heart of the engine. This chamber is where the energized air from the compressor is mixed with fuel and ignited. Fuel from up to twenty nozzles is cast into the airstream where the compound catches fire, producing hot expanding gases. Because the combustor can reach temperatures in excess of 2500 degrees, it is often made from heat-resistant material like ceramic.

The turbine consists of sharp discs that spin as hot gases leave the combustor. The function of the turbine blades is to extract energy from these gases. The turbine is also commonly connected to the air inlet via a shaft so their blades can spin simultaneously.

The final component of jet engines, the exhaust, is the component that creates thrust. As hot gases leave the exhaust through a nozzle and combine with the atmospheric pressure, velocity increases. At this point, the air meets up with the bypassed air where the combination of hot and cool air produces thrust.

At ASAP Aviation Stock, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for various jet engine components as well as parts for the civil aviation and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapaviationstock.com or call us at 1-763-401-8616.



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In aviation, the yaw axis is the direction the nose of the aircraft points in the left/right axis on a flat, horizontal plane. For conventional fixed-wing aircraft, yaw control is accomplished by a vertical stabilizer or rudder built into the tail of the aircraft, which steers the aircraft left or right much like a rudder steers a boat in the water. But helicopters don’t have rudders, so how do they achieve yaw control?

The answer depends on the helicopter’s design. For most conventional designs that feature a tail rotor, yaw control is obtained by adjusting the pitch of the tail rotor, which changes the thrust generated by the tail rotor, which in turn rotates the helicopter on its yaw axis. Say the helicopter has its tail rotor mounted on the left side of the tail. At a negative or low positive pitch, the low amount of thrust generated by the tail rotor will cause the aircraft to rotate right, while a high positive pitch will cause it to rotate to the left.

Not all helicopters have tail rotors, of course. The NOTAR (No Tail Rotor) system achieves similar results by varying thrust in its tail exhaust system, while a tandem rotor arrangement like in the CH-47 Chinook achieves yaw control via differential lateral cyclic. This means that to achieve right yaw, the front rotor tilts up on the left side and down on the right side of the helicopter, while the back rotor does the exact opposite. To achieve left yaw, the front rotor tilts up on the right side, and down on the left side, while the back rotor does the opposite once more.

A quadcopter, such as many popular consumer drones, obtains yaw control by adjusting the speed of its rotors. In a quadcopter, two rotors rotate in one direction, while the other two move in the opposite. By slowing one set of rotors and speeding up the other, the quadcopter can be steered in one direction or the other.

A coaxial helicopter such as the Kamov Ka-50 obtains yaw control by varying the torques of its main rotors (usually by varying the pitch of the blades) simultaneously in opposite directions of one another. Coaxial helicopters also often mount movable rudders like fixed-wing aircraft to reduce the main rotor adjustment needed.

At ASAP Aviation Stock, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the helicopter parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapaviationstock.com or call us at 1-763-401-8616.



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