Across the various helicopter models and categories used across the world, the two main types of landing gear that are most widely present are wheels and skids. Helicopter wheel landing gear typically consists of three or more wheels attached to the bottom of the helicopter, and the number depends on the intended operation and helicopter type. Helicopter skids, on the other hand, are long, fixed components that provide for similar landing abilities as wheels do. While each provides for their own advantages and disadvantages, there is no particular “better” choice. Wheels and skids both may benefit particular applications better than one another, and choosing between the two should depend on various factors of the helicopter in question. In this blog, we will discuss the differences between the two landing gear types, and the applications and helicopters that each serve best.


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The Bernoulli principle defines how air velocity and air pressure are related to each other and how both work can work together to give something lift. An object must have "lift" to fly, a force which pushes it upwards. Because of a relation called the Bernoulli Principle, wings produce lift. In this case, the "wings" of a helicopter are the rotor blades. They rotate at high speed and therefore have apparent velocity relative to the air, just as plane wings do when moving forward. As the air moves over the blade it generates lift by deflecting the air and by the low pressure on top of the wing.


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There are many different helicopter rotor system designs in use on modern helicopters. The three most widely-known designs are fully articulated, semi-rigid, and rigid. Newer, more advanced systems featuring mostly composite materials are also now in use and are known as hingeless systems. This blog will look at each rotor system and provide an explanation of their unique features and functions.


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The two most common types of helicopter engines are the reciprocating engine and the turbine engine.The heat produced by a helicopter’s engine must be dissipated by either cooling the outside of the engine, cooling the combustion chamber or cooling the oil. Oil cooling is extremely important in maintaining optimal engine performance. Aircraft Oil Coolers help maintain the oil temperature of an aircraft while the engine is running. The thermostatic valve on an oil cooler reroutes the oil back through the system if the oil does not require cooling.


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As with any motorized vehicle, wheel brakes are extremely important for the safety and control of an aircraft. When landing, they can help slow down the aircraft to safer speeds for stopping, as well as help pilots navigate the aerodrome with steering, taxiing, parking, and more. Most aircraft braking systems are operated through hydraulic pressure, and pilots can utilize the system with pedals, though some may feature separate hand levers as well. Sometimes, due to the size and weight of aircraft, powered braking systems can aid a pilot in slowing down the aircraft when the pedals are not enough. There are various types of aircraft brakes to help with slowing down and controlling the vehicle, which we will discuss below.


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Helicopters have come a long way since their creation in Germany during WWII. We have seen the emergence and evolution of helicopters for attack, transport, observation, utility, and beyond. Despite the multiple applications that helicopters can serve, they often use the same types of landing gear. The most common landing gear for helicopters includes wheels, skids, and floats. In this blog, we will discuss the three main types of landing gear and what their differences are.


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Many people nowadays have flown in an aircraft at some point in their life. They may gaze from their seat as the wings glide through the sky, see the engines spin fast during takeoff, or maybe watch a movie on a provided screen on the seat in front of them during their flight. Others may be fascinated by the many tools and electronics they see in the captain’s cockpit as they enter and exit the plane. All of these are things that make up the planes that we are familiar with, but there are actually millions of small and large aircraft parts that all come together to make these grand machines. And with all of these parts, the need to eventually repair or replace comes with time.


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Jet engines are marvels of engineering. A symphony of tiny, intricate parts work in tandem to make an aircraft take flight. Although it's easy to be overwhelmed by the complexity of each moving part, the basic jet engine components are relatively simple. There are five main sections of an engine: the air inlet, the compressor, the combustor, the turbine, and the exhaust. This blog will provide some basic information on each of these.


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In aviation, the yaw axis is the direction the nose of the aircraft points in the left/right axis on a flat, horizontal plane. For conventional fixed-wing aircraft, yaw control is accomplished by a vertical stabilizer or rudder built into the tail of the aircraft, which steers the aircraft left or right much like a rudder steers a boat in the water. But helicopters don’t have rudders, so how do they achieve yaw control?


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