Fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters are robust vehicles, and enacting proper maintenance and cleaning procedures can ensure that they continue to provide their services for a long period of time. While the maintenance and repair of various aircraft parts, helicopter engine components, and more can extend service lives, it is also very important that regular cleaning is carried out. While cleaning may serve to improve aesthetic appearances, it also presents additional ways to protect aircraft and helicopter parts through the removal of damaging substances or materials. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of common cleaning procedures so that you may properly care for your aircraft.


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When entering a flight training program, individuals have the choice of learning how to pilot airplanes or helicopters. While fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft are both capable of achieving heavier-than-air flight, they are quite different in their application, control scheme, regulations, and more. Prospective pilots can achieve their licenses and certifications for both aircraft, but the time, cost, and effort needed for such affairs will demand that individuals choose one to start with before learning the other. To figure out which aircraft type is best for you to begin with, we will provide an overview of the various differences between both.


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Helicopters are transportation mediums that have revolutionized our ability to traverse the sky, allowing for pilots to have 360 degrees of control over the rotorcraft, the capability of hovering, as well as other features that other various vehicles may not have. With recent fatal accidents that have shocked many communities, some individuals wonder how safe a standard rotorcraft is for either piloting, transportation, or simple leisure activities. While helicopters are often compared to aircraft in regard to safety, they can also be held against other options such as automobiles and public transportation mediums such as trains. To help you understand the safety or risk of helicopters battery, we will discuss how they compare against other common transportation types.


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If you have ever flown in a helicopter or watched pilots conduct flight operations, you may have noticed that some pilots will wear a helmet while others will only have a Adapter headset. As pilots in fixed-wing aircraft do not use helmets as well, one may wonder if there are benefits to utilizing such protective equipment or mandatory rules that dictate their use. In this blog, we will discuss helicopter helmets and their functionality, answering the question of why some pilots wear them while others don’t.


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A CAGE Code, or Commercial and Government Entity Code, is an important five-character identification number used to support mechanized systems throughout the government and provide a standardized method of identifying a given entity and their specific location. CAGE codes are assigned by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and are recognized by such organizations as the United States Department of Defense, NASA, and many NATO countries. Prior to doing business with the U.S. government or NATO, companies and corporations must first acquire a unique CAGE Code. In this blog, we will take a deeper look at CAGE Codes, their value, and where they fit in relation to other unique identifiers involved in government contracting.


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When securing materials together for an aircraft assembly, mechanical fastening serves as the most commonly used method. Fasteners are hardware devices that can affix parts together in a permanent or non-permanent fashion, and they can come in a variety of shapes, sizes, materials, and types to accommodate different needs and structures. Regarding the construction of aircraft, rivets, bolts, nuts, bearings, and other fasteners all work together to provide rigorous assemblies that can withstand the forces of flight.


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Actuators are important components for the operation of machinery, allowing for actions to be carried out through the use of control signals and energy. From the simple operation of opening a valve to rotating an automobile wheel, actuators serve many roles and applications with their various types. Additionally, actuators can be powered through multiple means such as hydraulic pressure, pneumatic pressure, and electrical current. Due to their simple but crucial role in the operation of machinery and systems, understanding their functionality and varying types can be useful for ensuring that the right components are chosen for a given application.


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Diesel engines serve as the source of power for huge machines like trucks, trains, ships, submarines, and more. On the surface, they are highly similar to the more common gasoline engines. Despite this, they operate in a slightly different way, generate more power, and do so more efficiently. This blog will explain diesel engines, how they differ from gasoline engines, what makes them more efficient, and their other advantages.


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When selecting the rotary actuator for your system, among the most important design considerations are mechanical efficiency, package size, shaft options, max rotation, and cost. Apart from these, you must also consider characteristics including backlash, load-stopping ability, and its ability to handle both axial and radial loads on the shaft. There are two main types of pneumatic rotary actuators: rack & pinion and vane actuators. This blog will explain both types, as well as their pros and cons.


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Torquing is the process of tightening a fastener to the ideal level. Though it may not seem important on the surface, improper torquing of a fastener can lead to serious consequences as severe as damage to the entire structure, machine, or component it is installed in. Torquing to perfection is a difficult process which requires engineering-level expertise on how to handle fasteners. The effect of perfect torquing can do a lot to extend the service life of fasteners as well as the component it is used in. As a matter of fact, many premature structural failures are due to improper fastening. This blog will explore what torquing is, why it’s important, and how it is done.


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Just like automobiles, aircraft of all types require regular maintenance and inspections for their engine oil systems. During flight operations, an aircraft may be exposed to a number of contaminants including dirt, sand, salt, and much more. These contaminants are important to remove from the system as soon as possible, as they may lead to corrosion, abrasion, and other damages that may affect the performance or service life of the engine oil system or surrounding components. In this blog, we will discuss some quick tips that can help you establish good maintenance practices and protect your aircraft.


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Helicopters are a magnificently adaptable airborne vessel, equipped for supporting an expansive cluster mission from elevated emergency vehicle, to flying horticultural utilization of pesticides, to substantial lift and tower development. While agile and deftly noticeable all around, helicopters present exceptional difficulties to ground bolster work force accused of ground treatment of the airplane.


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A common misconception is that oil filters and spacer oil strainers are the same thing. While this is not totally true, they do bear many similarities to one another. Their first similarity is the task they perform: to remove contaminants from oil as it passes through. Additionally, both filters and strainers protect downstream equipment by removing debris or contaminants that would otherwise compromise the integrity of the component. Both filters and strainers can be required by law or regulation for a variety of safety or environmental reasons, to improve the efficiency of the system, or merely for practical purposes. In many cases, the flowstream would be rendered useless without a filter or strainer.


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Across the various helicopter models and categories used across the world, the two main types of landing gear that are most widely present are wheels and skids. Helicopter wheel landing gear typically consists of three or more wheels attached to the bottom of the helicopter, and the number depends on the intended operation and helicopter type. Helicopter skids, on the other hand, are long, fixed components that provide for similar landing abilities as wheels do. While each provides for their own advantages and disadvantages, there is no particular “better” choice. Wheels and skids both may benefit particular applications better than one another, and choosing between the two should depend on various factors of the helicopter in question. In this blog, we will discuss the differences between the two landing gear types, and the applications and helicopters that each serve best.


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The Bernoulli principle defines how air velocity and air pressure are related to each other and how both work can work together to give something lift. An object must have "lift" to fly, a force which pushes it upwards. Because of a relation called the Bernoulli Principle, wings produce lift. In this case, the "wings" of a helicopter are the rotor blades. They rotate at high speed and therefore have apparent velocity relative to the air, just as plane wings do when moving forward. As the air moves over the blade it generates lift by deflecting the air and by the low pressure on top of the wing.


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There are many different helicopter rotor system designs in use on modern helicopters. The three most widely-known designs are fully articulated, semi-rigid, and rigid. Newer, more advanced systems featuring mostly composite materials are also now in use and are known as hingeless systems. This blog will look at each rotor system and provide an explanation of their unique features and functions.


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The two most common types of helicopter engines are the reciprocating engine and the turbine engine.The heat produced by a helicopter’s engine must be dissipated by either cooling the outside of the engine, cooling the combustion chamber or cooling the oil. Oil cooling is extremely important in maintaining optimal engine performance. Aircraft Oil Coolers help maintain the oil temperature of an aircraft while the engine is running. The thermostatic valve on an oil cooler reroutes the oil back through the system if the oil does not require cooling.


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As with any motorized vehicle, wheel brakes are extremely important for the safety and control of an aircraft. When landing, they can help slow down the aircraft to safer speeds for stopping, as well as help pilots navigate the aerodrome with steering, taxiing, parking, and more. Most aircraft braking systems are operated through hydraulic pressure, and pilots can utilize the system with pedals, though some may feature separate hand levers as well. Sometimes, due to the size and weight of aircraft, powered braking systems can aid a pilot in slowing down the aircraft when the pedals are not enough. There are various types of aircraft brakes to help with slowing down and controlling the vehicle, which we will discuss below.


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Helicopters have come a long way since their creation in Germany during WWII. We have seen the emergence and evolution of helicopters for attack, transport, observation, utility, and beyond. Despite the multiple applications that helicopters can serve, they often use the same types of landing gear. The most common landing gear for helicopters includes wheels, skids, and floats. In this blog, we will discuss the three main types of landing gear and what their differences are.


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Many people nowadays have flown in an aircraft at some point in their life. They may gaze from their seat as the wings glide through the sky, see the engines spin fast during takeoff, or maybe watch a movie on a provided screen on the seat in front of them during their flight. Others may be fascinated by the many tools and electronics they see in the captain’s cockpit as they enter and exit the plane. All of these are things that make up the planes that we are familiar with, but there are actually millions of small and large aircraft parts that all come together to make these grand machines. And with all of these parts, the need to eventually repair or replace comes with time.


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Jet engines are marvels of engineering. A symphony of tiny, intricate parts work in tandem to make an aircraft take flight. Although it's easy to be overwhelmed by the complexity of each moving part, the basic jet engine components are relatively simple. There are five main sections of an engine: the air inlet, the compressor, the combustor, the turbine, and the exhaust. This blog will provide some basic information on each of these.


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In aviation, the yaw axis is the direction the nose of the aircraft points in the left/right axis on a flat, horizontal plane. For conventional fixed-wing aircraft, yaw control is accomplished by a vertical stabilizer or rudder built into the tail of the aircraft, which steers the aircraft left or right much like a rudder steers a boat in the water. But helicopters don’t have rudders, so how do they achieve yaw control?


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